The Needle Drop

New Music

Brockhampton - "1999 WILDFIRE"

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The fuck am I looking at—a Brockhampton music video that's not in 4:3? Y'all were right: RCA changed them!

Piss-take aside, "1999 WILDFIRE" is the All-American Boyband's first official single of the year, promoting their upcoming album The Best Years of Our Lives, and it's cause for celebration if only because it's the type of banger that listeners seem to wish "Tonya" had been. It's not a bad one at that, with its OutKast-worthy hook and, damn, that bearface breakdown. Glad to hear him being integrated into the group's music more and more. These teaser tracks aren't giving us at TND much of a reason not to be optimistic about the new album. Hopefully that'll still be a summer drop.

Death Grips - "Hahaha"

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“Hahaha” is the fourth single from Death Grips' upcoming album Year of the Snitch, whose June 22 release date has just been revealed.

The track samples a number of Death Grips’ past songs, most apparently "Lock Your Doors" in the intro. It also features pervasive record scratching contributed by DJ Swamp, who is said to be featured on the majority of the album. These elements, along with the slew of sudden instrumental shifts, put “Hahaha” among the trio's most disorienting and multi-faceted tracks.

serpentwithfeet - "seedless"

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New York-based singer and avant-garde artist serpentwithfeet will release his debut album soil tomorrow through Secretly Canadian. The album’s singles so far have displayed the artist's unique mix of soul and electronic music.

The latest single, “seedless,” is co-produced with Clams Casino. serpentwithfeet’s trembling falsetto is here in full force, as his dark and intimate lyrics describe a flawed relationship. “seedless” has a more straightforward structure than the album’s previous singles, but is made more ominous by an unsettling spoken-word passage.

soil will follow 2016’s blisters EP. serpentwithfeet will embark upon a North American tour later this month.

-Owen Murray

Pusha T - "The Story of Adidon"

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Drake’s “Duppy Freestyle” seemed like a savage response to Pusha T’s diss on “Infrared.” However, Pusha’s response, “The Story of Adidon,” changes the playing field and makes it look like “Infrared” was setting the bait rather than poking the bear.

The first shock that comes with “Story of Adidon” is the cover which, as Pusha T points out on Twitter, is an actual photo of Drake in blackface.

Rapping over the No I.D.-produced beat to Jay-Z’s “Story of OJ,” Pusha keeps the shocking revelations coming. Among jabs at Drake’s recent single “I’m Upset” and his producer Noah “40” Shebib, Pusha alleges that Drake secretly has a son with a pornstar. “You are hiding a child, let that boy come home.” He couldn’t have said it more bluntly.

Pusha finished off by saying he wants to see Drake angry, inviting another response. Again, “Duppy Freestyle” seemed like a hard act to follow, but Pusha T somehow made it sound effortless.

-Owen Murray

Drake - "Duppy Freestyle"

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Pusha T took shots at Drake on “Infrared,” the closer of his new album, DAYTONA. Push called out Drake for using ghostwriters in the bars, “The lyric pennin’ equal the Trumps winnin’ / The bigger question is how the Russians did it.”

On “Duppy Freestyle,” Drake fires back hard at Pusha T and Kanye West, who produced DAYTONA. The context surrounding the track is similar to “Back to Back” which Drake released in 2015 as a response to Meek Mill’s accusations that he used ghostwriters. This time, Drake takes an even harsher tone.

At times Drake is defensive—“Whoever’s supposedly making me hits but ain’t got no hits sound like they need me”—but it’s when he takes the offensive that he sounds serious. He points out what he sees as hypocrisy, calling back to when he helped Kanye with “Father Stretch My Hands” and “30 Hours.” He also questions Push’s integrity with the line, “Man, you might've sold the college kids for Nike & Mercedes / But you act like you sold drugs for Escobar in the '80s.”

Drake has never been one to stay quiet when challenged and his quick response shows that this time is no different.

-Owen Murray

James Blake - "Don't Miss It"

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In January, James Blake released the mellow, atmospheric single “If the Car Beside You Moves Ahead.” Now he has followed it up with “Don’t Miss It,” a collaboration with Mount Kimbie’s Dominic Maker. The tender ballad has a similarly glitchy aesthetic to its predecessor and features self-reflective lyrics over an instrumental that centers around piano and electronic drums. The vocals are pitch shifted and frenetic, but sound incredibly emotional nonetheless.

In addition to his own singles, James Blake worked on “King's Dead” from the Black Panther OST and played piano on André 3000’s recent single “Look Ma No Hands.” Blake’s last album, The Colour in Anything, came out in 2016. He has not yet announced a follow-up.

-Owen Murray

Oh Sees - "Overthrown"

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San Francisco rock band Oh Sees (previously Thee Oh Sees and other variations) are back after last year’s Orc and Memory of a Cut Off Head, the latter of which was released under the OCS moniker. The band has become known for its prolificness, so the quick release of this new single, “Overthrown” comes as little surprise.

Thee Oh Sees have never been afraid to crank up the volume, but they've really upped the ante for “Overthrown.” While staying true to their garage rock and psychedelic foundation, the band puts a greater focus on metal and prog rock influences.

“Overthrown” is the first single leading up to Oh Sees’ upcoming album, Smote Reverser, which drops August 17 via Castle Face. They’re kicking off a tour this weekend at Boston Calling.

-Owen Murray

Aesop Rock - "Klutz"

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New York-originating rapper Aesop Rock has been known throughout his career for his relentlessly wordy and enigmatic style, and his new single “Klutz” is no exception. The dark and paranoid song is a testament to his status as a top-tier wordsmith - no hook or refrain necessary; just bar after bar of dense rhymes. Aesop Rock acknowledged this in a statement about the song, saying that occasionally “song structure eludes me and it feels good. No problem-solving or pesky hit chorus, just rambling.”

Aesop Rock released his "Hot Dogs" single last year, as well as the third installment of a collaborative EP series with Homeboy Sandman called Lice. His last album, The Impossible Kid came out in 2016.

-Owen Murray